What is wellness?

The Wellness Series | What is wellness?

Wellness is a broad, holistic integration of physical, mental and emotional wellbeing. Yes, it’s about fuelling the body nutritionally and physically, but it’s also about engaging the mind and nurturing our emotional wellbeing.  Not just surviving – but thriving. The World Health Organization has defined health as not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, but “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being”.  Wellness is an attitude; the practice of healthy habits on a daily basis to attain better physical and mental health outcomes, not jumping on a health fad or exercise craze. Several lifestyle areas are key dimensions of overall wellness. They include: social connectedness, exercise, nutrition, sleep and mindfulness. Each one has an impact on your physical and mental health – ie, your wellness. By making simple and healthy choices on a daily basis, you will be well on your way towards reducing stress and having positive social interactions.  

Social Connectedness

Connecting with friends or loved ones is a great way to help improve your physical and mental health. Strong ties with family, friends and the community provide us with happiness, security, support and a sense of purpose. Being connected to others is important for our mental and physical wellbeing and can be a protective factor against anxiety and depression. “What we try and emphasise is community – whatever that might mean for you,” says Healthfix Senior Coach Mark Wilson. “Healthfix embodies that social connectedness as all members of our public, whether they’re doing rehab or working towards performance-based goals – come together and work in the same space. It also serves a good education purpose, in that no matter the ability, we’re all trying to be better and improve.”  

Physical movement

Even 20 or 30 minutes of daily exercise can have a positive impact on your overall sense of wellbeing and help improve your mood. WHO has identified a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes high intensity exercise per week to have a marked impact on how people are feeling physically and emotionally. This is thanks to the release of endorphins, a type of neurotransmitter that helps relieve pain and stress. Physical activity also stimulates the release of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, which play an important part in regulating your mood and improving sleep cycles. Regular exercise also helps balance your body’s level of stress hormones. Don’t know where to start? Try a brisk walk on your lunch break or opt for the stairs instead of the lift when you can. “It is important that people get the appropriate type of physical activity,” advises Mark. “If you’re not sure, keep it low intensity. Light physical activity is a great way to help improve wellbeing and prevent injury.”  

Nutrition

By adding wholesome ingredients to your plate, you’ll be taking steps towards a healthier you. The food we eat gives our bodies the “information” and the materials they need to function properly. For example, your immune function thrives on vitamins A, E and C, while your metabolism is affected by potassium, niacin and B6.  “We are what we eat,” says Mark. “Nutrition is an absolute keystone to health and wellness – anyone can out-eat any exercise routine. It’s important to get the right foods in the right quantities, avoiding foods that might cause us harm.”  

Sleep

Sleeplessness and mood disorders are closely linked. And it can work both ways – sleep loss can affect your mood, and your mood can affect how much and how well you sleep.  Your amygdala is the fear processing unit in your brain. The good news is that not only is it reset during the night under deep REM sleep, it also becomes less active following a good night’s sleep.  Ask yourself: when was the last time you woke up feeling refreshed? Do you feel that you’re currently getting a good night’s sleep to energise you for the next day?  Consistent bedtime practices can help get you a good night’s sleep. Avoid caffeine after 12pm, include quiet and calm activities before going to bed, and wake up at the same time every day – these are simple ways you can begin your journey towards becoming a successful sleeper.  

Mindfulness

Did you know that practicing mindfulness is good for the body and mind, helps with focus and also changes the brain? Take a moment right now to consider your own mind and how you are feeling. The more you tap into your own thoughts, the more you may become aware of how you react to stressful events. Healthfix’s integrative approach can help you achieve optimal wellness, particularly through its Wellness Coaching program, where Mark and team can work with you to find solutions to areas which are presenting as roadblocks to leading a healthier more bountiful life. “If you take the word wellness out, and replace it with whatever you personally want to work on – say, routine, lifestyle, healthy eating, sleeping, motivation, anything – that’s essentially what wellness coaching is,” explains Mark. “The coaching element remains constant, it’s just the goal that changes.” Healthfix utilises different methodology in its wellness coaching, including The Check Institute’s holistic health system, which focuses on the four-doctor principal: Dr Diet, Dr Quiet, Dr Happiness and Dr Movement. Contact us today to find out more.
New Year health goals | tennis

Kick-starting 2021 | Firing up your New Year health goals 

We’re all glad to bid 2020 a not-so-fond farewell. And while we can’t guarantee a *whole* new start for 2021, it is within our power to set achievable New Year health goals that will see us through the year – and beyond. Many people make the mistake of unrealistic expectations when it comes to their New Year resolutions. Buoyed by the idea of a brand spanking new year, and excited for what’s to come, vague immeasurable promises such as “lose weight”, “get fit” or, worse, “quit <bad habit/food type>” almost guarantees disappointment. This year, set yourself up for success by using the S.M.A.R.T. system. What’s that, exactly? Well, we’re glad you asked. Here’s how you can set achievable goals, and nail them. 

 

S is for Specific

In order for a goal to be effective, it needs to be specific. As with most things, the devil is in the detail: ask yourself what needs to be accomplished? What steps will need to be taken to achieve it? Who will I need to connect with to help? This is the first step to accomplishing your New Year health goals.  For the team at Healthfix, specifics are the building blocks of any health change. Where you and where you’re going can only ever be measured with the nitty-gritty, whether that’s mobility specific, or weight based, or getting you ready for your next ultramarathon. Thinking through these prompts will help set a highly-specific goal that not only lays out what you’re aiming for, but also gives any necessary context. Which leads us to…

 

M is for Measurable

“Specific” is a solid start, but it’s missing something – “specifically” (see what we did there?) it’s detail-orientated mate: numbers. Specific can’t be achieved without numbers. And you can’t count numbers without being specific. Numbers can sometimes be scary, but they can also be powerful. We believe it’s crucial to quantify any goal – it makes it that much easier to track progress and know when you’ve reached the finish line. Plus, beating the number makes things fun. 

 

A is for Achievable

Goals should be empowering — not high pedestals from which you eventually tumble. That’s why this letter of the acronym is dedicated to ensuring that your New Year health goal is achievable. Put simply, this is the point in the process when you (and we) take a reality check. Is the goal you’ve outlined so far actually reasonable? Is it something we could realistically accomplish? Honesty is the backbone of our health club, and we will consider and face any conditions or limitations that might impede your goal, together.

 

R is for Relevant

Nobody wants to set goals for the sake of setting them. There should be a real benefit attached to actually reaching that target, although in the case of health, there’s always a benefit. That said, this “R” should be relevant to you and your own health journey. Think about why the goal is actually important to you? What is its key benefit? Once we identify how it fits into your core beliefs, we can incorporate into your actual goal so that you and the team have a grasp on the larger picture.

 

T is for Timely

Goals can’t stretch into infinity – they need a deadline. That’s the important final piece of S.M.A.R.T. goals. It also underscores the other four goal pointers, and is an important piece of measuring success. We like to make sure we’re all on the same page about when a goal can and can’t be reached. Are you expecting to see results immediately? In a month? In five years? We feel strongly about finite therapy – your health journey shouldn’t be endless monthly physio appointments with no light at the end of the tunnel. Health goals, like any goals, should have realistic timelines included in them, so that everyone – you, your therapists, your trainer – stays on track. 
Shoulder pain

Focus on: shoulder pain | Top 5 tips for managing shoulder pain 

Shoulder pain is a common physical occurrence. Your shoulder is a complex, highly mobile structure made up of several components. When considering the shoulder you need to think about the collarbone connecting to your chest, the collarbone connecting to the shoulderblade or scapula, and finally the arm bone joining to the scapula. Strong tendons, ligaments and muscles support your shoulder and make it stable. In younger people, pain is more likely to be due to an accident or injury. However as you age natural changes occur to your shoulder joint and the rotator cuff tendon, similar to seeing wrinkles and grey hairs in the mirror. We also see pain more strongly associated with how one is using – or perhaps not using – their shoulder. Here are five easy tips to help manage shoulder pain and keep your joint strong.  

#1 Shoulder pain diagnosis

There are many causes of shoulder pain and not all of them are due to problems of the shoulder joints or associated structures. Accurate diagnosis is important. “Common pathology is frozen shoulder, impingent, tendinopathy and referral from the scapular or neck,” physiotherapist and Healthfix founder Sean Cooney. “To treat your pain effectively, it’s crucial to know what to treat.”

 

#2 Using full range

When experiencing shoulder pain, the protective muscles around the joint try to keep your arm by your side in an effort to restrict movement. Activating the muscles that move the shoulder through its full range (these are called the antagonist muscles) can significantly reduce your recovery time.

 

#3 Comfortable and progressive loading

Everyone’s progress is different. Make sure you don’t push yourself or your shoulder beyond what feels comfortable. That said, strength is built with progressive loading – that is, a little more weight and/or repetitions as is safe for your particular issue. “Monitor your pain one to two hours after exercise or the next morning to know if you’re loading correctly,” advises Sean. 

 

#4 Don’t go too far

Pain management is the first step to regaining strength in any part of the body. Sean recommends to first get comfortable with using your arms below shoulder height, gradually moving up to shoulder height before – no points for guessing – graduating to using your arms above your head. “This is a safe way to ensure you’re not going too far when regaining your full range of motion,” says Sean.

 

#5 Stretch. And stretch again.

“Stretching can serve as a great tester and reliever of pain, not to mention the best way to improve flexibility in the shoulder. A daily doorway stretch can help mitigate shoulder pain or find out if you’re lacking some essential range of motion. To do this, find yourself a clear doorway, stretch the arm overhead to grasp the door frame, then lean forward to create resistance. If you’re suffering from shoulder pain, our team of physiotherapists and exercise physiologists can help. Book an appointment online today.

Christmas Group Training Timetable

Healthfix Instagram Posts 21   From Monday the 21st December – 1st January we will be running a Christmas Group Training Timetable. During this period we will be offering two class types, Strength & Conditioning and General Pilates

What is Strength & Conditioning?

The Strength and Conditioning group training sessions will combine mobility and flexibility, aerobic exercise and resistance training in varying amounts, to help you develop strength, cardiovascular fitness and prevent injury.

What is General Pilates?

The General Pilates class will have a full-body focus and develop your flexibility and mobility, stability and control through a variety of floor-based movements.

Christmas Timetable 

Monday, 21st December
  • Strength & Conditioning at 6:00 am with Jonathan
  • General Pilates at 6:30 am with Amy
  • Strength & Conditioning at 1:00 pm with Bladen
Tuesday, 22nd December
  • Strength & Conditioning at 6:00 am with Jonathan
  • Strength & Conditioning at 1:00 pm with Bladen
  • General Pilates at 6:00 pm with Amy
Wednesday, 23rd December
  • Strength & Conditioning at 6:00 am with Jonathan
  • General Pilates at 6:30 am with Amy
  • Strength & Conditioning at 1:00 pm with Jonathan
Thursday, 24th December
  • Strength & Conditioning at 6:00 am with Jonathan
Friday, 25th until Monday, 28th December (All inclusive)
  • Nil
Tuesday, 29th December
  • Strength & Conditioning at 6:00 am with Jonathan
  • Strength & Conditioning at 8:30 am with Amy
  • General Pilates at 6:00 pm with Amy
Wednesday, 30th December
  • Strength & Conditioning at 6:00 am with Jonathan
  • General Pilates at 6:30 am with Amy
  • Strength & Conditioning at 8:30 am with Jonathan
Thursday, 31st December
  • Strength & Conditioning at 6:00 am with Amy
  • Strength & Conditioning at 8:30 am with Jonathan
Friday, 1st January:
  • Nil
Saturday, 2nd January:
  • Normal group training schedule returns
 
Healthy Christmas

‘Tis the season | 12 ways to keep on top of your health goals

1. Eat a good breakfast

The easiest way to a healthy Christmas is to eat a good breakfast. Skip breakfast, and you may fill up on sugary snacks midmorning, or overindulge at that office lunch. So make sure you make your first meal of the day your most nutritionally balanced. Opt for sugar-free muesli, Greek yoghurt, smoothies or eggs to get your day off to the best start.  

2. Get out of the house

Make the holidays a family affair and plan outdoor activities where everyone is involved, like a long walk after a particularly heavy meal for example. Exercise doesn’t need to be at a gym – use summer to change up your regular exercise, like a beach run instead of hitting the treadmill.  

3. Prioritise your workouts in the morning

While everyone’s having a lie-in, get your workout over and done with – getting your heart rate up and working your muscles will help metabolise all that excess festive “spirit” later in the day. And can indulge when everyone else remarks, “Oh, come on! It’s Christmas…  

4. Celebrate the seasonal flavours

Unlike our northern hemisphere friends, an Australian Christmas falls in the midst of our summer, when a smorgasbord of fresh seasonal produce is available to all. Add to that our love of Asian cuisine, and its inherently lighter dishes, and you have a recipe for a healthy Christmas lunch that doesn’t include potatoes three ways and stuffing.  

5. Swap out the sweets

Instead of turning to the traditional mince pies, chocolates and fudge, opt for fruit skewers, frozen mango bars and icy poles as the treats in which you indulge. Perfect for a hot Australian Christmas Day.  

6. Engage Your Brain

While it’s tempting to zonk out in front of the TV after a big meal, keep your mind active by playing games like Trivial Pursuit or Charades. It’s a great way of getting everyone together, and exercises your grey matter. If you aren’t a ‘game’ person, engage your mind by setting up any new gadgets, such as Playstations, iPads, mobile phones or laptops.  

7. Do something active every day

Set aside at least 20 minutes a day for some kind of fitness training – it doesn’t matter if it’s a brisk walk, yoga, a jog, Pilates or enthusiastic karaoke dancing, as long as it gets your heart rate up and moves those muscles.  

8. Find a workout buddy

If you can find a supportive workout buddy, that’ll help a lot – you can help keep each other on track so you don’t fall off the health wagon in December.  

9. Drink less alcohol, more water

Christmas in an Australian summer means dehydration is a real danger, especially if you’ve been hitting the booze. Reward your backyard game of cricket with a glass of water rather than a cold beer for a more healthy Christmas.  

10. Keep regular sleep patterns

Good health requires consistent, high-quality sleep, but this can sometimes be a challenge because of the new stresses that Christmas-time brings. Add in the hot weather and it can be tricky to get the sleep you need. Try and stay on top of your sleep patterns so you don’t ‘crash and burn’ from fatigue.  

11. Use common sense at the Christmas table

When it comes to eating over this Christmas, eat smart: choose more turkey, salad, vegetables and fruit, and less ham, cake, pudding and chips. Give soft drinks a firm no and keep your portion sizes under control.   

12. Keep stress to a minimum

‘Tis the season to be jolly’ but jolly is the last thing many of us feel with overspending, cooking, cleaning, endless ‘to do’ lists and visitors we could do without. Try to keep a sense of humour and proportion. Is it really the end of the world if the carrots are overcooked or if the table setting isn’t perfect? Remember, Christmas (and Aunt Ethel’s disapproving glare) is just one day out of 365. We can help you have a healthy Christmas and stay fit over this crazy period, and beyond, with a tailored program designed to get you at your best. Contact us today.
Relieving back pain

Focus on: back pain | Help relieve a sore back with these lifestyle tips

Back pain and posture

Poor posture can make back pain worse, especially if you sit for long periods. Be conscious of your posture: sit upright, with your shoulders relaxed and your body supported against the back of your chair. Try putting a pillow or a rolled towel between your lower back and your seat, and keep your feet flat on the floor. If you suffer from back pain, it might be a good idea to invest in an ergonomic chair.

Stay active

It may feel counterintuitive, but bed rest or staying still is one of the worst things you can do for a sore back. It’s important to move, no matter how slowly. Gentle exercise has been found to be one of the most effective ways to relieve back pain quickly. Don’t rest for more than a day or two. Swimming, walking and yoga are all great ways to get moving again. 

Stretch it out

Studies show that yoga can help alleviate neck and back pain. Regularly stretching the muscles, tendons and ligaments that support the spine is an important element of all back exercise programs.  Stretching can reduce tension in muscles supporting the spine; tension in these muscles can worsen pain from any number of back pain conditions. It also helps improve range of motion and overall mobility.

Strengthen your core

Strong back and abdominal muscles can help heal most types of back pain, especially the most common form of back pain caused by soft tissue injury or back muscle strain. Back and abdominal muscles, referred to as core muscles, tend to weaken with age unless specifically exercised. The abdominal muscles and back muscles provide the strength to keep the body upright and for movement. When these core muscles are in poor condition, additional stress is applied to the spine as it supports the body, and back injury or back pain is more likely. Exercises that strengthen these core muscles should be a part of a balanced back/abdominal exercise program. Pilates is great for core strengthening.

Lose the luggage

Carrying an overstuffed handbag or heavy backpack slung over one shoulder can force your spine into a rotated position and cause an asymmetrical posture. It makes the muscles on one side of your back work much harder to maintain balance, which puts you at greater risk of back pain and injury. Backpack wearers, use both straps – distributing weight evenly helps to protect against back strain.

Stress less (or at least try to)

Work, home life and everyday worries – these days, there’s more than a few of them – can leave you stressed. Add that to the frustration of back pain, and it’s not uncommon to feel tense. Which in turn can make pain feel worse, and diminish motivation to stay active – which again, doesn’t help your mood. It’s a vicious cycle. Positive thinking, and relaxation techniques like deep breathing exercises can help. 

Start physiotherapy

Physiotherapists can teach you how to sit, stand, and move in a way that keeps your spine in proper alignment and alleviates strain on your back. They’re also experts in specialised exercises that strengthen the core muscles that support your back. A strong core is one of the best ways to prevent more back pain in the future. Studies show that when you increase your strength, flexibility, and endurance, back pain decreases — but it takes time. The Healthfix team benefits from being led by our director Sean Cooney, who studied Physiotherapy at the University of Sydney and is completing his Masters in Sports Physiotherapy at LaTrobe University. He’s also worked extensively as a personal trainer . Sean’s approach blends both performance and injury management. Book in to see how he and the team can help with your back pain.
Weight loss tips - Our top 5 food and fitness tips

Our top 5 tips on weight loss | Food and fitness

1. Keep a food diary

Regularity and planning is key to successful weight loss. Try to map out your breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks for the week. “To fail to prepare is to prepare to fail,” says Accredited Practising Dietitian Melissa Juergens. You may find it helpful to make a weekly shopping list – it has been proven that shopping once per week will cost you less as well. Eating at regular times during the day helps fire up your metabolism, and reduces the temptation to snack.  

2. Control your portions

Further to planning your meals is portion control. One way to effectively do this is to use smaller plates, allowing you to gradually get used to eating smaller portions without going hungry. Chewing your food more is another way to help your brain catch up to your stomach: it takes about 20 minutes for the stomach to tell the brain it’s full. The average person chews each mouthful 3-5 times, when really you should aim for 20-30 times per mouthful  so chewing your food will enable you to recognise fullness signals. Key is to eat slowly, and stop eating before you feel full.   

3. Up your fibre for weight loss

Fruit and veg are your powerhouse fibre sources. Foods containing lots of fibre can help keep you feeling full, which is perfect for losing weight. You’ll find them in plant-based foods such as oats, wholegrain bread, brown rice and pasta, and beans, peas and lentils, and obviously fruit and veg. The latter also contain plenty of vitamins and minerals that support your immune system and gut health.   

4. Don’t ban foods

Do not ban any foods from your weight loss plan, especially the ones you like. Banning foods will only make you crave them more. There’s no reason you cannot enjoy the occasional treat as long as the majority of what you eat is filled with nutrient dense food.  

5. Be active

Being more active is key to supporting a healthy mind and healthy body and can help with losing weight – and keeping it off. As well as providing lots of health benefits, exercise can help burn off the excess calories you cannot lose through diet alone. Weight training will have a more long-term weight-loss effect as muscle growth burns more energy than cardio, however beyond this debate, the most important thing is to find an activity you enjoy and are able to fit into your routine.  

6. Drink plenty of water 

Try to drink 2-3 litres water per day. People sometimes confuse thirst with hunger, and you can end up consuming extra calories when a glass of water is really what you need.   

7. Cut down on alcohol

A standard glass of wine can contain as many calories as a piece of chocolate. Alcohol is calorie dense, with little nutritional value – why it’s sometimes referred to as “empty calories”. Your liver also has a special affinity for ethanol, an alcohol derivative. It turns almost all of it into energy aka calories, and when your body gets too much energy from alcohol, it starts to shunt the extra energy into the synthesis of storage products like fats. Over time, drinking too much can easily contribute to weight gain.   We can help you get back on the road to a fighting fit you – ask us how

New Physiotherapist – Joel Bates

Joel Bates at Healthfix

Introducing Joel Bates

An industry vet, Joel has been practicing physiotherapy since 2006 in Sydney and most recently Singapore. Over the years he has built extensive knowledge in treating acute and chronic injuries, helping people navigate often challenging times with honest, constructive and successful treatment solutions. He has had the pleasure of treating and learning from some amazing people along the way, from weekend athletes, ultra marathon runners, professional golfers, global CEO’s to high level lifters. Joel takes pride in delivering the highest quality physiotherapy care to each and every patient. Joel knows that pain and injury can be both complex and confronting, therefore cutting through the technical medical jargon and helping people understand their injury with effective and applicable information is critical. Joel applies his commitment to professional and personal development, allowing him to constantly evolve as a physiotherapist and as a person. This enables him to understand the person as well as the injury, ultimately leading to a fast and effective fix.

Why did you choose to pursue a career in physiotherapy?

Joel chose physiotherapy as it combined what he loved at school – human movement and helping people to be active and solve problems. He spent way to much time at physiotherapists as a teenager with stress fractures from cricket and shoulder problems from swimming, so he got to know what it was all about and love it. He has a deep passion for helping people and solving problems. No two injuries are ever the same so there is always a rewarding challenge each day and meeting great people along the way makes it good fun.

So what does Joel like to get up to outside of the clinic?

Joel is an avid sports fan and has mastered the art of watching an entire game of footy while chasing his young family around the house, backyard & beer garden. He has run a couple of half marathons whilst living in Singapore (which he tells himself are like full marathons in normal climates!). He makes sure he practices what he preaches with a mix of running, weights & golf keeping  fitness fun for him.  Book in to see Joel today!
 
ver 20,000 Australians will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year - an average of 55 people every day.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month | Your post-treatment recovery

Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting Australian women. Over 20,000 Australians will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year – an average of 55 people every day. (Source: Breast Cancer Network Australia.) It’s important to remember that most people survive breast cancer. The latest statistics show that the five-year relative survival rate for women diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011-2015 was 90.8 per cent. And many people live long and healthy lives well beyond this period. It can be a challenge during breast cancer treatment, and indeed after, to find the energy, motivation and willpower to keep up with regular physical activity. Chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and the emotional toll of a cancer diagnosis can take a great toll, both physically and mentally. Healthfix is fortunate to have been able to help many such clients in the past, and has found the following to be an effective way to slowly rebuild much depleted strength reserves.  

Establish a routine post breast cancer treatment.

It’s important to re-establish a regular exercise regimen, however different from your fitness routine pre-treatment. Scheduled exercise helps keep you motivated and on track.  

Keep it safe and fun.

Make sure you exercise at a level that’s safe for you. Going too hard too early can completely derail your efforts, physically and mentally. Keeping exercise fun and effective means keeping it within your ability. There’s no need to rush.  

Train with a workout buddy

Support is important. Having someone right alongside you on your journey to renewed health and fitness is immeasurable. They can keep that vision of life after treatment in focus – even when it’s hard for you to see it. Women aged between 50 and 74 are invited to access free screening mammograms every two years via the BreastScreen Australia Program, but women aged 40-49 and 75 and over are also eligible. It is recommended that women with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, aged between 40 and 49 or over 75 discuss options with their GP, or contact BreastScreen Australia on 13 20 50. If you have recently had a cancer diagnosis, or are undergoing treatment or in remission, we can help with your health and fitness needs. Give us a call.  
Community awareness: Healthfix and South Maroubra Surf Lifesaving Club

Together in isolation | What it means to be part of a community in 2020

We here at Healthfix have always strived to make an impact on our local community. Thanks to a tumultuous 2020, it’s not always easy. Lockdowns and isolation mean the relationships with people we don’t know – and in many cases, even those we do – is changing. Despite the negative societal impacts of COVID-19, there are many good-news stories of charity, togetherness and empathy to be found. In fact, our newfound resourcefulness may even redefine what community means to future generations. So in spite of the year’s best efforts to keep us apart, here are some of our own good-news stories about working together.  

A helping hand: South Maroubra Surf Lifesaving Club

With the fitout of our shiny new Health Club completed, we ended up with an oversupply of high-quality rubber gym flooring. Rather than ending up in landfill, these useful rubber tiles found a happy home at South Maroubra Surf Life Saving Club. Just like many sports seasons, the surf lifesaving season only kicked off a couple weeks ago, and these tiles are already getting put to good use helping store essential equipment. We appreciate the great work that they do and hope they have an uneventful summer season!  

Paying it forward: 80km endurance walk for Beyond Blue

We are so thankful to Craig who was able to help us stay charitable at a time with so much business uncertainty. Craig expertly installed the flooring at our new Health Club. When he realised he had some leftover floorboards that would be perfect for our kitchen, he only asked for a donation to support his 80km Bondi to Manly endurance event, raising money for Beyond Blue. Craig completed 101,944 steps over the 80km and helped raise $25k in the end – a great support for a great organisation that is truly helping a lot of people in the time of need at the moment. We love to hear from our community and give back where we can. Drop us a line!