executive health & wellness

Executive Health – Balancing Leadership & Wellbeing

In the fast-paced world of executive leadership, maintaining optimal health and wellbeing is not just a personal choice – it’s a strategic decision that influences professional success and overall quality of life. Let’s delve into the world of executive health and balancing leadership and wellbeing.

 

Defining Executive Health: A Holistic Approach

This is more than just physical wellness, it encompasses:
  • Physical Health: Nurturing your body through fitness, nutrition, and regular health check-ups.
  • Mental and Emotional Wellbeing: Managing stress, building emotional resilience, and fostering a positive mindset.
  • Work-Life Balance: Setting boundaries and engaging in activities outside of work for a harmonious life.
  • Sleep and Rest: Prioritising quality sleep to recharge and rejuvenate.
  • Preventative Care: Undergoing regular health assessments to catch potential issues early.

   

Prioritisation: A Cornerstone of Performance

Tim, a seasoned CEO with over a decade of leadership experience, believes that “Executive Health is a cornerstone of executive performance.” For Tim, an annual assessment was more than a requirement; it became a catalyst for positive change. This comprehensive assessment underscored the organisation’s commitment to his wellbeing and professional performance. Tim recalls that as his health improved, his overall well-being and role performance saw an undeniable surge. A healthier, more resilient Tim translated to enhanced leadership capabilities and greater agility in managing his multinational business, even amidst extensive travel schedules.  

 

The Journey from Idea to Action

The intersection of leadership demands and personal wellbeing often presents challenges. Tim overcame these hurdles by using the annual assessment as a springboard for change. He set tangible health and wellbeing goals, integrating them seamlessly into his organisational goals. Tim’s journey involved carving out ‘no meeting’ time slots for rest and physical activity, which provided the energy, focus, and capacity to excel in a demanding environment. This ignited a ripple effect that led his leadership team to prioritise their wellbeing too. This commitment to wellbeing didn’t just benefit Tim – it transformed the entire organisation. The establishment of a company gym and health program for all staff not only boosted employee engagement but also elevated overall performance.
 

 

Strategies for Sustaining Executive Health

Tim’s personal strategies encompassed regular physical activity, including both vigorous exercise and yoga/stretching routines. His experiences underscore the need for not just physical vitality, but also fuelling energy for performance through mindful dietary choices, especially when managing the impact of frequent travel and work-related events.  

 

The Lasting Impact

Prioritising executive health has ripple effects that extend far beyond an individual. It can transform an organisation’s culture, productivity, and overall performance. When leaders invest in their wellbeing, they inspire others to follow suit, creating a virtuous cycle of well-being that contributes to everyone’s success.

Executive health is not a luxury; it’s a necessity for achieving professional success, fostering leadership excellence, and nurturing a healthy work environment. Aspiring leaders should remember that by taking care of themselves, they are better equipped to take care of their organisations, teams, and overall responsibilities. Prioritising executive health is not just a choice; it’s a strategic imperative.

  For more information on health and wellness coaching check out this blog by Director Ash Cooney. Or if you want to start your journey, then book an appointment with one of the team today!

Exploring All Things Diabetes with Dr. Devina Joshi: Expert Insights for Optimal Management

Exploring All Things Diabetes with Dr. Devina Joshi: Expert Insights for Optimal Management

At Healthfix we are passionate about empowering our community with valuable information and resources for a healthier and happier life. Today, we are excited to share an enlightening video interview featuring Dr. Devina Joshi, an esteemed expert in diabetes management and prevention. In this blog, we invite you to delve into the world of diabetes and gain valuable insights from Dr. Joshi, covering various aspects of diabetes management, lifestyle modifications, and the latest advancements in treatments and technologies. Let’s embark on this educational journey together!   To access our full interview please click here

Understanding Diabetes

Diabetes is a complex and prevalent condition affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the video interview, Dr. Devina Joshi breaks down the different types of diabetes, shedding light on their distinct characteristics. Understanding the variations in diabetes can help individuals and their healthcare providers develop personalised management strategies for optimal health.

Identifying Risk Factors

One of the critical aspects of diabetes management is recognising the risk factors associated with the condition. Dr. Joshi shares valuable insights into identifying potential warning signs and understanding the factors that increase the risk of developing diabetes. This knowledge can empower individuals to take proactive steps in their health journey.

The Power of Lifestyle Modifications

Lifestyle modifications, such as diet and exercise, play a pivotal role in managing diabetes effectively. Dr. Joshi emphasizes the importance of adopting a healthy lifestyle, which can significantly impact blood sugar levels and overall well-being. Through practical tips and strategies, she encourages individuals with diabetes to take charge of their health.

Advancements in Diabetes Treatments and Technologies

The field of diabetes management is continually evolving, with advancements in treatments and technologies offering new possibilities for individuals living with the condition. Dr. Joshi highlights the latest developments in diabetes care, including innovative tools and techniques that can revolutionise diabetes management.

Empowering Individuals to Thrive

Throughout the interview, Dr. Joshi’s passion for helping individuals with diabetes shines through. Her expertise and commitment to empowering patients to live fulfilling lives while managing their condition serve as an inspiration to all. Watching this video, you’ll gain not only knowledge but also motivation to take positive steps towards better health. At Healthfix we believe that education is a powerful tool for transforming lives. Our collaboration with Dr. Devina Joshi brings you expert insights into diabetes management, offering practical guidance and encouragement. We encourage you to watch the video and embrace the valuable information shared by Dr. Joshi. Together, let’s take proactive steps towards optimal diabetes management and a healthier, more vibrant life. Remember, if you have any questions or would like to discuss your diabetes management further, our dedicated team at Healthfix is here to support you every step of the way. Take charge of your health today and embark on a journey of empowerment and well-being.

Healthy Hips: Tips for Managing & Relieving Hip Pain

Hip pain can be a challenging condition to deal with, impacting daily activities and causing discomfort and whether you’re an athlete or a weekend warrior, hip pain is a common issue that affects many people. In this blog post, we’ll explore common hip injuries and conditions that can cause pain and discomfort. Additionally, we’ll provide helpful physiotherapy tips for joint pain relief and management so you can have healthy hips!

Common Hip Injuries and Conditions

  • Arthritis: Hip arthritis is a common condition that occurs when the cartilage in your hip joint wears down over time, leading to pain and stiffness.
  • Bursitis: Bursitis is the inflammation of the bursae, the small sacs of fluid that cushion and lubricate the joints. In the hip, bursitis can cause pain and swelling.
  • Gluteal Tendinopathy: A very common condition, more common in older females, brought on by a sudden increase in activity or on-going poor biomechanics • Hip
  • Labral Tear: A hip labral tear is a tear in the cartilage that surrounds the hip joint. It can cause pain and instability in the hip. This is less common in the general population but good to look out for if you are experiencing a painful catching sensation in the hip after a fall or intense bout of exercise.

Tips for Joint Pain Relief and Management from Physiotherapy

  • Exercise: Initially gentle exercises such as stretching and low-impact activities like walking or swimming can help keep the hip joint mobile and reduce pain. Then once the acute symptoms have settled, a progressive strengthening program to improve the strength around the hip joint will help to reduce the risk of reoccurance.
  • Weight Management: Maintaining a healthy weight can help reduce pressure on the hip joint, which can help prevent injuries and reduce pain.
  • Hot and Cold Therapy: Applying heat or ice to the affected area can help reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Medication: Over-the-counter pain relievers such as paracetamol or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Seeking Professional Help: If you’re experiencing hip pain that isn’t relieved by self-care measures, it’s important to seek professional help from a physiotherapist or other healthcare provider. They can evaluate your hip pain and create a treatment plan that’s tailored to your needs

Exercises to Strengthen Your Hips

Exercises to strengthen your hips can also be helpful. 1. Hip Bridges: Lie on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Lift your hips off the floor until your knees, hips, and shoulders form a straight line. Hold for 5 seconds and then lower your hips back down to the floor. Repeat for 10-15 reps. 2. Clamshells: Lie on your side with your knees bent and your feet together. Keeping your feet together, lift your top knee up as high as you can while keeping your hips straight. Hold for 2-3 seconds and then lower your knee back down. Repeat for 10-15 reps on each side. 3. Squats: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Lower your body down into a squat, keeping your weight in your heels and your knees tracking over your toes. Hold for 2-3 seconds and then push back up to the starting position. Repeat for 10-15 reps   Hip pain can be a frustrating and debilitating issue, but there are many strategies you can use to manage and prevent it. Remember to listen to your body and take care of your hips – they’re essential for so many daily activities!     Caitlan Skillicorn, APA Titled Sport and Exercise Physiotherapist, Healthfix North Sydney

Personal Training Tips for Netball Players

Netball is a fast-paced and popular team sport that requires high levels of agility, speed, and endurance. While the sport comes with inherent risks, research suggests that proper preparation and training can significantly reduce the risk of injury. In this article, Amy provides Personal Training tips for netball players, so you can get the most out of your netball training and preparation.  

Get Ready to Dominate the Court: A Guide to Plyometrics, Strength Training, and Conditioning

As a netball player, it’s important to not only practice your skills on the court but also work on your strength and conditioning off the court. Plyometric exercises, strength training exercises, and conditioning drills are all key components of a well-rounded training program for netball players. Plyometric exercises involve explosive movements that can improve power and agility on the court. These exercises can help you develop faster reaction times, better jumping ability, and stronger legs. Some examples of plyometric exercises that are specific to netball include jumping drills and lateral hops.
  • Jumping drills can include exercises like squat jumps, where you squat down and then jump as high as you can, or tuck jumps, where you jump and bring your knees up towards your chest. These exercises can help improve your vertical jump, which is important for rebounds and intercepts.
  • Lateral hops involve jumping side to side and can help improve your lateral movement, which is important for defending and changing direction quickly on the court. To perform lateral hops, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and jump sideways, landing on the opposite foot. Repeat this movement side to side as quickly as you can.
Strength training exercises are also important for netball players, as they need strength in their legs, core, and upper body to perform at their best. Some examples of exercises that target these areas include squats, lunges, planks, push-ups, and rows.
  •   Squats and lunges can help improve leg strength, which is important for jumping and running on the court. Planks can help improve core strength, which is important for stability and balance. Push-ups and rows can help improve upper body strength, which is important for passing and shooting.
Finally, conditioning drills are crucial for netball players as the sport requires players to have good cardiovascular endurance. Examples of conditioning drills that can improve endurance and fitness include shuttle runs, sprints, and interval training.
  • Shuttle runs involve running back and forth between two points, while sprints involve running as fast as you can for short bursts. Interval training involves alternating periods of high-intensity exercise with periods of rest or lower intensity exercise. These drills can help improve your stamina and help you keep up with the fast pace of the game.
 

Avoiding Injury on the Netball Court: Tips for Preparation

In addition to these training tips, there are specific strategies you can use to prevent injuries while playing netball. According to a study published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ankle sprains are the most common injury in netball players, accounting for approximately 20% of all injuries. However, the study also found that the use of ankle braces and regular proprioception training (exercises that improve balance and coordination) can reduce the incidence of ankle sprains by up to 50%. Knee injuries are also common in netball players, particularly ACL tears. However, research suggests that strengthening exercises for the hips, knees, and ankles can help prevent these injuries. A study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that a neuromuscular training program (which included exercises to improve balance, jumping, and landing techniques) reduced the incidence of ACL injuries in female athletes by up to 72%. To reduce the risk of finger injuries, coaches should focus on teaching proper catching and throwing techniques. These techniques can help players avoid jammed or dislocated fingers, which are common injuries in netball. Lastly, shoulder injuries can occur in netball players due to the repetitive overhead throwing motion involved in the sport. To prevent these injuries, it’s important to regularly strengthen the shoulder muscles and use proper throwing technique. Exercises like shoulder presses, lateral raises, and reverse flys can help strengthen the shoulder muscles and improve performance on the court. In summary, proper preparation and training can significantly reduce the risk of injury in netball players. Incorporating exercises like plyometrics, strength training, and conditioning drills can help improve overall performance on the court, while also reducing the likelihood of injury. Additionally, focusing on proper technique and using protective equipment like ankle braces can further reduce the risk of injury in netball players.   By taking the time to properly prepare for the physical demands of netball, players can enjoy the sport while also minimising the risk of injury.   So, whether you’re a seasoned player or just starting out, remember to prioritise your training and safety on the court. If you want to arrange an appointment with a personal trainer to help with your netball progress, book here. Good luck and have fun playing netball!       By Amy Yeoland, Personal Trainer Healthfix North Sydney

Move to Improve: How Exercise Physiology Can Benefit People with Diabetes

According to the World Health Organization, diabetes affects over 420 million people worldwide, with numbers expected to rise in the coming years. Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects the way the body processes glucose, a type of sugar that is the body’s main source of energy. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types can benefit greatly from regular exercise, which can help manage blood sugar levels, increase insulin sensitivity, and reduce the risk of complications associated with diabetes. So read on to find out how exercise physiology for people with diabetes.  

How Exercise Can Help People with Diabetes

  1. Blood sugar management: Regular exercise can help manage blood sugar levels by increasing the body’s sensitivity to insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps regulate blood sugar levels. When the body becomes less sensitive to insulin, blood sugar levels can rise, leading to diabetes. Exercise can help increase insulin sensitivity, allowing the body to better manage blood sugar levels.
  2. Weight management: Maintaining a healthy weight is important for people with diabetes. Exercise can help with weight management by burning calories and building muscle mass. Maintaining a healthy weight can help reduce the risk of complications associated with diabetes, such as heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage.
  3. Cardiovascular health: People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Exercise can help reduce this risk by improving cardiovascular health. Regular exercise can help lower blood pressure, reduce cholesterol levels, and improve circulation, all of which can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Using an Exercise Physiologist to Help Manage Diabetes

An exercise physiologist is a healthcare professional who specialises in the study of how the body responds to exercise. They can work with people with diabetes to develop personalised exercise plans that are tailored to their individual needs and goals. An exercise physiologist can help people with diabetes by:
  1. Assessing fitness levels: An exercise physiologist can assess an individual’s fitness levels and develop a personalised exercise plan that takes into account their current fitness levels, medical history, and any complications associated with diabetes.
  2. Providing guidance and support: An exercise physiologist can provide guidance and support throughout the exercise program. They can help people with diabetes stay motivated and on track with their exercise goals.
  3. Monitoring progress: An exercise physiologist can monitor progress and make adjustments to the exercise plan as needed. This can help ensure that the exercise plan is effective and safe for the individual with diabetes.
Exercise can be a powerful tool for managing diabetes. Regular exercise can help manage blood sugar levels, improve cardiovascular health, and reduce the risk of complications associated with diabetes. An exercise physiologist can provide guidance and support to help people with diabetes develop personalised exercise plans that are safe and effective.  

How to get started with exercise

Starting an exercise routine can be daunting, especially if you’re feeling overwhelmed or unmotivated due to your diabetes. Here are some tips to help you get started:
  1. Talk to your healthcare provider: Before starting any exercise routine, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider. They can help you determine what type of exercise is safe and appropriate for you, and can offer guidance on how to manage your diabetes during exercise.
  2. Start small: If you’re feeling overwhelmed, start with small, manageable goals. Even a short walk around the block can be a good place to start. Gradually increase the duration and intensity of your exercise routine over time.
  3. Find an exercise buddy: Having a friend or family member to exercise with can be a great source of motivation and accountability. You can also join a diabetes support group or exercise class to meet others who are also managing diabetes through exercise.
  4. Hire an exercise physiologist: An exercise physiologist can help you develop a safe and effective exercise plan that’s tailored to your individual needs and goals. They can also provide guidance and support to help you stay motivated and on track.
  5. Celebrate your successes: Don’t forget to celebrate your successes, no matter how small they may seem. Every step in the right direction is a victory, and acknowledging your progress can help keep you motivated and on track.
    By Daniel Thomson, Exercise Physiologist North Sydney    

References

  1. Colberg, S. R., Sigal, R. J., Yardley, J. E., Riddell, M. C., Dunstan, D. W., Dempsey, P. C., … & Tate, D. F. (2016). Physical activity/exercise and diabetes: a position statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care, 39(11), 2065-2079.
  2. Chudyk, A., Petrella, R. J., & Maly, M. R. (2011). Effects of exercise on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Diabetes Care, 34(5), 1228-1237.
  3. American College of Sports Medicine. (2018). ACSM’s guidelines for exercise testing and prescription. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Ready, Set, Fun Run! Learn to Run and Crush Your Fun Run with these Physio Tips!

Think you can’t run? Think again! With these tips from Caitlan Skillicorn Senior Physiotherapist and the help of a physiotherapist, you can prepare for a run event and achieve your running goals safely and effectively. Whether you’re a beginner or just looking to improve your running, these tips will help you start your journey towards becoming a stronger and healthier runner. So don’t let your doubts hold you back – lace up your shoes and let’s get started!

Getting started 

Getting started with running can be an exciting but daunting task, especially if you are new to the sport. Here is a guide to help you get started and prepare for an event like a fun run or City to surf with the help of physiotherapy:

  1. Start Slowly: If you are new to running, it is important to start slowly and build up gradually. Begin with shorter distances, such as 2-3km runs, and increase your mileage by no more than 10% each week. This will help you avoid injury and build endurance gradually.

  2. Wear Proper Footwear: Wearing the right running shoes is important to reduce the risk of injury. Consult with a physiotherapist or a specialist running shoe store to find the right pair of shoes for your foot type and gait.

  3. Warm-Up and Stretch: A proper warm-up can help reduce the risk of injury and prepare your body for exercise. Start with some light stretching exercises, such as lunges, squats, and leg swings, and gradually increase the intensity of your warm-up.

  4. Follow a Training Plan: A structured training plan can help you build endurance and prepare for a long distance run. Consult with a physiotherapist to create a personalised training plan that takes into account your current fitness level, injury history, and other factors.

  5. Cross-Train: Cross-training can help you build overall fitness and reduce the risk of injury. Incorporate strength and flexibility exercises into your training routine to help prevent injury and improve performance.

  6. Monitor Your Progress: Keep track of your runs and monitor your progress. Use a GPS watch or smartphone app to track your distance, pace, and heart rate. This can help you stay motivated and make adjustments to your training plan as needed.

  7. Rest and Recover: Rest days are important to allow your body to recover from exercise and prevent overuse injuries. Make sure to include rest days in your training plan and prioritise good sleep and nutrition.

  8. Address Any Injuries: If you experience any pain or injuries during training, seek the advice of a physiotherapist. They can help you address the underlying issue and develop a treatment plan to get you back on track.

Common Injuries 

  Speaking of injuries, as with any physical activity, running can also carry a risk of injury, especially for those who are just starting out or increasing their mileage. Here are some of the most common injuries that runners may experience when starting to run longer distances:
  1. Shin Splints: This is a common overuse injury that occurs when the muscles and tendons surrounding the shin bone become inflamed. Shin splints are often caused by increasing mileage or intensity too quickly, and can be prevented by gradually increasing mileage and incorporating strength and flexibility exercises into your training routine.
  2. Plantar Fasciitis: This is an inflammation of the plantar fascia, a band of tissue that runs from the heel to the toes. Plantar fasciitis can cause sharp pain in the heel or arch of the foot, especially during the first steps after waking up or after sitting for a long time. This injury is often caused by overuse, improper footwear, or a lack of flexibility in the calf muscles.
  3. IT Band Syndrome: This is a common knee injury that occurs when the iliotibial (IT) band, a thick band of tissue that runs from the hip to the shin bone, becomes tight or inflamed. IT band syndrome can cause pain on the outside of the knee and is often caused by overuse or poor biomechanics.
  4. Runner’s Knee: This is a broad term that refers to several different types of knee pain, including patellofemoral pain syndrome and chondromalacia patella. Runner’s knee can cause pain around the kneecap and is often caused by overuse, poor biomechanics, or a lack of strength in the muscles surrounding the knee.
  5. Achilles Tendinitis: This is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. Achilles tendinitis can cause pain and stiffness in the back of the heel and is often caused by overuse or a lack of flexibility in the calf muscles.
If you do experience an injury, it’s important to rest and seek physiotherapy treatment if necessary. With proper training and precautions, running can be a safe and rewarding form of exercise that can help you achieve your fitness goals.

With these tips, information and the help of a physiotherapist, you can prepare for a long distance or fun run and achieve your running goals safely and effectively.

Shoulder injuries how to assess, diagnose and treat: Healthfix Physiotherapy advice

Shoulder injuries how to assess, diagnose and treat: Healthfix Physiotherapy advice

  By Caitlan Skillicorn,  Senior Physiotherapist M. Physio & B. Ex. and Sport Sc.  

Your shoulder: what you need to know

  • Its the most unstable joint in the body (imagine a golf ball on a tea or a beach ball on dinner plate!)
  • Its the only upper body bony attachment where the sternum and clavicle meet
  • The muscles and ligaments are heavily relied on for stability due to the range of movement the joint can function in. The two groups involved in shoulder activation include:
  1. Stabilisers – Rotator cuff (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor)
  2. Movers – Deltoid, Pectoral muscles, serratus, lats, traps
    https://www.ehealthstar.com/anatomy/shoulder-muscles
     

How do Physiotherapist’s assess shoulder pain?

The subjective assessment will drive the objective assessment, this means that we delve into the cause of the pain first by getting a thorough history from you including:
  • Any history of trauma such as a fall
  • If there has been a sudden increase in training loads (gym, housework, renovations etc)
  • How long you have experienced pain for especially if it is low levels of pain for a long period of time
After reviewing this information, we then do a series of objective testing to see how your shoulder is moving and which movements elicit a pain response, these may include:
  • Active range of movements and repeated movements to see if any fatigue changes the movement pattern
  • Resisted movements
  • Special tests and manual muscle testing using a device
The purpose of these tests are to see what movements produce pain or limitations amongst the anatomy of your shoulder.  

How do Physiotherapist’s diagnose your shoulder complaint?

The three key areas physiotherapists use to diagnose shoulder injuries include:
  • Is it torn? (trauma or degenerative)
  • Is it stiff? (frozen shoulder, osteoarthritis, post-operative)
  • Is it irritable? (tendinopathy, bursitis etc)
 

When is it likely that your symptoms are not actually coming from your shoulder?

Often we find that clients symptoms are not directly related to their shoulder. The most common indications of this are if you experience:
  • Nerve related symptoms so things like pins and needles, numbness or burning sensation in your hands and fingers
  • If experience pain specifically in the upper trapeziues muscles
  • If you have restricted neck range of movement
  • If these are true then it is most likely that you
 

If you are unsure if you need to see a Physiotherapist

The most common complaint we see in active clients who are training in the gym is impingement which means the pain is triggered at the end of the range of movement or after 90 degrees of flexion. If this is you we recommend you change the angle of your movement and reduce the weight and volume (kgs and reps) and if symptoms don’t settle within a week then your best off to see a Physiotherapist for assessment and treatment.   Do you have a shoulder issue or are unsure about whether physiotherapy treatment will help your condition? To arrange to speak with one of our expert physiotherapists get in touch with us now! getfixed@healthfix.com.au        

Healthfix event – How to use a proactive healthcare approach to be your personal best at any age

You are invited!

Early in his career Sean identified that the health care approach of finding and focusing on problems was only leading to people feeling fear and limitations from conditions they were diagnosed with and being more reliant on therapists for maintenance care. He knew there was a better way and that involved getting people active in things they loved to do, using a team of experts with a common goal and empowering people to feel confident in both their ability and understanding of their bodies, were the solutions to achieve long term results.  Then came Healthfix 11 years ago in which Sean has built the systems and quality assurance to deliver these results to client’s time after time. Sean’s approach and vision have been sought by the wider community including NSWIS and various advisory boards.

We invite you to come and spend an evening with Sean to gain an understanding of how this approach can help you with a real result despite any injury or condition you experience.

An Evening with Sean Cooney

Healthfix Founder Sports titled Physiotherapist Manager Performance Health at NSW Institute of Sport UTS Physiotherapy Advisory Board Member Member of the Australian College of Physiotherapists

Topics we will cover include:
  • What is proactive health (health care vs sick care)
  • Why proactive health achieves superior results
  • Common heath conditions (including back pain, headaches, tendonitis)
  • How to be your personal best at any age

We look forward to seeing you there! To reserve your spot please rsvp to getfixed@healthfix.com.au

Young Athlete Development

Written by Caitlan Skillicorn, Senior Physiotherapist
M.Sports Medicine (completion date 2022) M. Physio, & B. Ex. and Sport Sc. Head of Performance at Gladesville Ravens.   High performance sport is becoming increasingly important in our world and as a result, stakeholders are making large financial investments to develop strategic and systematic approaches to developing athletes. This is pushing talent identification earlier and earlier. So, to keep up with this development programs now occur at youth levels. Children are not mini adults and therefore maturation status must be accounted for when planning a program and pathway to elite athlete status. Gold standard programming must include the unique variables and understanding of:
  1. Physical development relative to age and training history
  2. Nutrition relative to education and performance level
  3. Injury risk relative to age-related changes and training demands
At Healthfix in our gym in North Sydney, we understand these underlying principles and have systemised programs to give our athlete’s the best chance of making their dreams come true. An integral part of any high performance program is strength and conditioning. The development of not only a player’s technical ability but their physical capabilities has become increasingly important, with players who can out run, out jump and dominant their opposition on the ball have increased their selection chances and decreased their injury risk. Not only do we teach our athletes the correct movement patterns and improve their confidence in the gym environment but also development their athletic potential, giving the best chance to be the best athlete they can be. Who would benefit from a Youth Athlete development program?
  • School aged youth 10-17 ·
  • Youth athletes looking for that extra edge over their competitors
  • Want to enhance performance characteristics related to their sport
  • Need a more robust gym program to supplement their sport
If you are interested in more information on our Young Guns Program please get in touch  getfixed@healthfix.com.au

Physio Near Me Blog Series Introduction

The popularity of “physio near me” and is it a good thing?

 

So the old word of mouth isn’t quite what it used to be hey? Now, instead of going a great job, or in the case of physio helping someone to a great outcome, and knowing that that person will tell friends, family and work colleagues it seems it can be easier to be funny or interesting on social media instead to grab people’s attention.

I’m not so sure.

We use SEO help at Healthfix, I know not all local health clinics do. We grew massively through word of mouth in the early phases of Healthfix and as we opened more clinics and had team members progress from physio’s to leadership positions we started using SEO in order to get our message across to larger and larger audiences. At the moment, I have our main SEO man saying that you need to use more content talking about “physio near me”. I’m always happy to trust a fellow professional so I thought I’d at least make it educational.

I’ll do a 3 part series to talk about “physio near me” and when it could be good and when it might not work out for you.

In the first part I’ll talk about the conventional method of physio growth and how it used to be before Google and social media had their ways.

In the second section, I’ll talk about when a “physio near me” search is a good thing.

Finally, I’ll give my thoughts on when using a “physio near me” might not work and what you need to consider instead.